mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject. mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject.

mymodernmet:

When photographer Sandro Miller decided to do a project to honor the photographers who had inspired him and shaped his career, he called on his longtime friend and frequent collaborator John Malkovich to help him. The result is Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, a brilliant series of 35 recreations of iconic portraits, all starring the actor as the subject.

weandthecolor:

John Malkovich as Diane Arbus’ Identical Twins

Photographer Sandro Miller has collaborated with John Malkovich for a huge photo series called Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters.

You can see more of the project with John Malkovich on WATC.

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amjayes:

“People loved Colin because they could identify with him. They loved him because of his incredible driving, but also because occasionally he made mistakes.” - Ari Vatanen about his untamed Subaru team-mate Colin McRae.

(via automotivated)

musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about. musterni-illustrates:



———————
a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.


Finally a libra definition to be stoked about.

musterni-illustrates:

image

———————

a new zine called shitty horoscopes that i’ll be premiering this year at the Toronto Queer Zine Fair, among other things! hopefully i’ll make volumes available for online purchase soon. credit where credit is due: this was inspired by the huge number of made-up horoscopes floating around tumblr lately, and angry-poems.

Finally a libra definition to be stoked about.

(via butterscotchblondie)

draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying

draumbouy:

misinterpreting:

iamsmallcat:

the last one killed me

this is the best thing ever

im crying

(via butterscotchblondie)

silversarcasm:

disabled children need to know that they’re worth more than being inspirational objects for abled adults

(via butterscotchblondie)

hellformotors:

Porsche 917 & Steve McQueen

(via speednstyle)

beesandbombs:

flower
house-of-gnar:

Aghori ascetics
The Aghori are ascetics of the Shaiva Hindu sect. They reside on the outskirts of Hinduism and are known for their post mortem rituals and covering themselves in ceremonial ashes.
read more about there views of death here
photos by JoeyL













house-of-gnar:

Aghori ascetics
The Aghori are ascetics of the Shaiva Hindu sect. They reside on the outskirts of Hinduism and are known for their post mortem rituals and covering themselves in ceremonial ashes.
read more about there views of death here
photos by JoeyL













house-of-gnar:

Aghori ascetics
The Aghori are ascetics of the Shaiva Hindu sect. They reside on the outskirts of Hinduism and are known for their post mortem rituals and covering themselves in ceremonial ashes.
read more about there views of death here
photos by JoeyL













house-of-gnar:

Aghori ascetics
The Aghori are ascetics of the Shaiva Hindu sect. They reside on the outskirts of Hinduism and are known for their post mortem rituals and covering themselves in ceremonial ashes.
read more about there views of death here
photos by JoeyL













house-of-gnar:

Aghori ascetics
The Aghori are ascetics of the Shaiva Hindu sect. They reside on the outskirts of Hinduism and are known for their post mortem rituals and covering themselves in ceremonial ashes.
read more about there views of death here
photos by JoeyL













house-of-gnar:

Aghori ascetics
The Aghori are ascetics of the Shaiva Hindu sect. They reside on the outskirts of Hinduism and are known for their post mortem rituals and covering themselves in ceremonial ashes.
read more about there views of death here
photos by JoeyL













house-of-gnar:

Aghori ascetics
The Aghori are ascetics of the Shaiva Hindu sect. They reside on the outskirts of Hinduism and are known for their post mortem rituals and covering themselves in ceremonial ashes.
read more about there views of death here
photos by JoeyL

house-of-gnar:

Aghori ascetics

The Aghori are ascetics of the Shaiva Hindu sect. They reside on the outskirts of Hinduism and are known for their post mortem rituals and covering themselves in ceremonial ashes.

read more about there views of death here

photos by JoeyL

(via butterscotchblondie)

huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here.  huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter
Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.
See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here. 
dezeen:

Penda creates snowdrift-inspired interiors for a Chinese ski retreat » dezeen:

Penda creates snowdrift-inspired interiors for a Chinese ski retreat » dezeen:

Penda creates snowdrift-inspired interiors for a Chinese ski retreat » dezeen:

Penda creates snowdrift-inspired interiors for a Chinese ski retreat »
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 
see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 

see-linewoman:

red3blog:

This is from March of 1989 and was on the #3 rated show in the country. I’m having a hard time imagining anything similar today because so many people are committed to the myth that this lesson has been learned.

I agree that we wouldn’t see this on TV today but not for those reasons. It’s not because TV executives think rape culture is over. They wouldn’t show it because they want to make as much money as humanly possible and there is a belief, an incorrect and misguided belief, that you can’t say things like this and attract a wide audience. It’s the same principle that eradicated all the great black sitcoms from the 90s including shows like this one. Remember Moesha, The Fresh Prince, Martin, The Wayans, Living Single, Sister Sister, The Arsenio Hall Show? Remember their multi-faceted portrayals of blackness? They’re gone and wouldn’t see the light of day in this “golden era” of television. In the 90s, networks like Fox, for instance, needed to make money and were in the position to take risks. We got UPN, the CW, WB. All these great outlets for entertainment, and I hesitate to say “black” entertainment because these shows were loved by everyone. They were made by us (which is huge) and for us, but they didn’t feel as limiting as say a Tyler Perry movie. But once big money started to roll in and networks started to perk up, they didn’t need us anymore. It became harder for black television and filmmakers to find jobs behind the scenes. If there are no black voices, all that multifaceted goodness just goes down the drain. And let’s not forget the FCC and how they rule with an arbitrary, puritanical, iron fist. In governing the networks, they too are responsible for limited discourse and representation like this scene here. Anyway, I’m rambling. But you get the picture. Networks are well aware of the issues, but if it’s not going to make them money then they aren’t going to talk about it. When they believe defeating rape culture is cool again, they’ll talk about it. When they believe black people on screen will make them money, like in say Basketball Wives, The Real House Wives, The Bad Girls Club (in all their ratchet glory) they’ll cast them. But until then, we are shit out of luck. 

(via lavenderpenny)